USF Criminal & Social Justice Program offered panel discussion

The University of St. Francis (USF) Criminal & Social Justice Program presented a panel discussion on “Reporting, Investigating & Human Consequences of Police Misconduct: Alton Logan’s 26 Year Odyssey of Wrongful Incarceration” on Wednesday, Feb. 18. Logan was a part of the discussion.

Alton Logan discussed “Reporting, Investigating & Human Consequences of Police Misconduct: Alton Logan's 26 Year Odyssey of Wrongful Incarceration” on Wednesday, Feb. 18 at the University of St. Francis in Joliet.

Alton Logan discussed “Reporting, Investigating & Human Consequences of Police Misconduct: Alton Logan’s 26 Year Odyssey of Wrongful Incarceration” on Wednesday, Feb. 18 at the University of St. Francis in Joliet.

Logan, who endured 26 years of wrongful incarceration, shared his thoughts on police misconduct and his personal experience. His case led scores of police abuse victims to come forward with stories ranging from minor mistreatment to torture. With the help of his lawyer, Harold J. Winston and internal investigator Francine J. Sanders; who helped uncover the Jon Burge Chicago-era of torture and police misconduct, Logan was released from prison. Both Winston and Sanders were a part of the panel.

Winston is supervisor in the Legal Resources Division of the Cook County Public Defender Office and previous supervisor of the Post-Conviction Unit of the Cook County Public Defender’s Office. She has obtained new trials in eight separate cases for clients convicted of murder, such as Logan. The Logan case was covered by “60 Minutes.” Winston has argued before the Illinois Supreme Court and the Illinois Appellate Court.

Sanders is a Chicago-based writer and teacher. She was previously an investigator for the Chicago Police Department’s Civilian Investigative Unit of the Office of Professional Standards. During that time, she handled hundreds of excessive force cases, including some of the unit’s most high profile, sensitive cases such as the investigation of torture allegations against former Chicago Police commander Jon Burge. She also recently worked as an investigator for the Illinois Torture Inquiry and Relief Commission.

Also on the panel was John Conroy, the author of two books, Belfast Diary: War as a Way of Life and Unspeakable Acts, Ordinary People: The Dynamics of Torture, along with the play My Kind of Town, which premiered at Chicago’s TimeLine Theatre in May 2012. The play is set against the backdrop of the Chicago police torture scandal, which he was instrumental in exposing. He is the recipient of numerous awards for journalism. He now works for the DePaul University College of Law as senior lecturer and director of Investigations for the DePaul Legal Clinic.

The panel discussion was at 7 p.m. in San Damiano Hall in Donovan Hall of the university’s Motherhouse at the Joliet campus.

The University of St. Francis, in Joliet, Ill., has 46,000 alumni throughout the country. USF serves 3,400 students nationwide, offering undergraduate, graduate and doctoral programs in arts and sciences, business, education, nursing, health care and social work. For information, call (800) 735-7500 or visit www.stfrancis.edu.


Media Inquiries:
Nancy Pohlman, Executive Director of Community Relations
(815) 740-3379 | npohlman@stfrancis.edu