Mathematics

Alfred North Whitehead described mathematics as the most original creation of the human mind.

For more than 5,000 years, this creation has grown and evolved. Today it permeates virtually every intellectual discipline.

The Math program at the University of St. Francis gives students a full exposure to topics in undergraduate mathematics along with analytical skills to continue lifelong learning and application of mathematics.

Mathematics Department faculty members get excited about innovations in technology and education and bring both to their classrooms. They also work closely with their students to cultivate a student’s personal interest.

Worried about “mathematical bumps?” Don’t be. Your professors will be there to help. Plus, the Math Center, part of the Academic Resource Center, staffed by department faculty and top students, and serves as a valuable resource for students throughout the university community.

All mathematics majors at USF culminate their studies with Senior Seminar, which includes a research project that challenges students to incorporate and expand upon the knowledge acquired in their mathematics courses. Completion of a Major Portfolio is also a requirement of Senior Seminar. The portfolio includes samples of the student’s mathematical work, evidence of participation in activities of the mathematical community and a reflection of mathematical growth.

 

What can you do with a mathematics degree?

The common perception is that mathematics majors become math teachers. Right now, there is great demand for math teachers in middle schools and high schools.

But a mathematics degree in no way limits students to a teaching career. USF’s curriculum can prepare a student for graduate study (even in law!); for a career in business or industry; or for a number of other professions including teaching. The concentration in actuarial science can lead to a career as an actuary within the insurance field or as a consultant.

Employers value the critical-thinking and problem-solving abilities of mathematics majors. Many career options require the daily use of mathematics and significant quantitative skills:

  • Actuaries
  • Mathematicians
  • Statisticians
  • Operations research
  • Financial analysts
  • Marketing analysts
  • Computer programmers
  • Systems analysts
  • Purchasing agents